How to Run Faster and Further Without Expending All Your Energy

If you are new to the sport of running, then you’ll know all too well the feeling of being winded and utterly depleted if you’ve pushed yourself too hard or too quickly at the start of your run. This might lead you to feel demotivated. But it may not be your fitness level that is the problem, but rather your speed and technique.

A Proper Warm-up Routine

Your warm-up routine will play an important part in how well your run. One way to measure how well you run is to use an RPE (Rating of Perceived Effort) This tool will help to measure the rate at which your heart is working – the higher the rating the harder your heart will work; a lower rating will indicate the opposite.

You should try to aim for at least a 15-minute warmup; this will prepare your muscles properly in anticipation for the run ahead. This is especially important if you are preparing to run in cold weather as it will get the blood pumping, increase your core temperature and also the blood flow to your muscles.

Monitoring your Heart Rate

Monitoring your heart rate is perhaps the most important starting point. You can measure this by subtracting your age from 220. The maximum limit that your heart rate should be (beats per minute) is 65 per cent of your maximum heart rate (MHR) or lower. If you find that you can run at this rate without getting winded, then you can gradually increase your pace until you reach 85 per cent of your MRH.

Maintaining Correct Posture

Make sure your torso is taut and upright and that you are breathing from your diaphragm. This will help with your breathing as opposed to bending over while running which puts more pressure on the lungs, which will increase your breathing at a faster than normal rate.

Swinging your arms at a 90-degree angle will help in your overall technique so that most of the strain isn’t put on your legs alone.

Another interesting method to see if you are pushing yourself too hard too quickly is if you cannot say a complete sentence while running. If you aren’t managing this, it may mean you need to slow down the pace.

Get a Rhythm in Place

You’ll know you got this right if you take a breath for every two strides you take. This rhythm, called LRC (locomotor-respiratory coupling), will ensure that you get into a natural relaxed rhythm of running which will also help in improving your endurance levels.

And lastly, mental strength is of paramount importance; focussing on the finishing line instead of your speed is a much better alternative. After you’ve employed all these techniques successfully, your endurance ability will automatically improve and you will be able to run faster and further than ever before.

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